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The Monday report

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Good Monday morning!

A quick inside look at what's going on this week:

Our major news story, in print on Wednesday and online late tomorrow, is a look at City Hall's proposal for improving access to the Genesee River as it passes through Rochester.

Called ROC the Riverway, it consists of more than two dozen different projects - trails, parks, new bridges, and some interesting (and sometimes zany) other proposals.

Our story will include a fairly detailed list of those projects and an indication of when city officials hope to get them done. You can see the full plan here,  on the city's website.

You can get an in-person look at the plan during the first public hearing on the project: Thursday, 4 to 6 p.m., at MCC's downtown campus on State Street.



City Hall is encouraging comments on the plan, which you can leave on the city's website. And we hope you'll share your thoughts with us. You can post them on our article when it's published tomorrow or on our Facebook page. Or you can send an email to our Feedback section: themail@rochester-citynews.com.

Later today, our digital editor, Kurt Indovina, is heading to the South Wedge Mission on Caroline Street to experience the solitary-confinement cell that activists have set up there. He'll share his experiences with  you.

From our music writers: Tomorrow afternoon, the Lilac Festival is announcing the lineup for this year's festival. We'll have it online tomorrow afternoon.

And there's this happening in our environment beat, from CITY's Jeremy Moule:
The state Canal Corp is having an informational meeting about its vegetation management plan from 6 to 8 p.m. Tuesday at A.D. Oliver Middle School Auditorium, 40 Allen Street, Brockport.

The meeting is about the next phase of the Canal Corp's project — the agency's contractors have already removed trees in Brockport. Village officials actually support the management plan, Mayor Margay Blackman says. They weren't happy about how it was rolled out, nor do they feel like it was well-explained. But Brockport has had past incidents where tree roots caused water to leak out of the canal and cause flooding
The village had a leak into one of its parks after a tree fell over and its root began siphoning water into the park, for example.

Village officials issued a list of questions to the Canal Corp in advance of the Tuesday meeting, much of them dealing with how the Canal Corp will work with the 70 impacted property owners to install new, appropriate vegetation and privacy screenings. Blackman says Canal Corp officials have committed to paying for privacy screenings.

Brockport leaders also want to know how the lawsuit from Eastside communities will affect the remedial work in the village.


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